The Value of Using Drone Video in Your Content

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Producing fantastic video content often relies on flexibility; the capacity to overcome tricky obstacles . What appeared like magic solely five years ago (an affordable, flying, radio-controlled camera) is currently real and available to all film-makers on any budget.

There are very expensive drones available on the market used for cinema-grade cameras on large productions. Still, with cautious planning and a simple consumer-grade drone, film-makers can add varying degrees of creativity, value, and, most of all, beautiful storytelling to even their most modest productions.

Below, I’ll lay out some of the motives you need to think about when using a drone in your productions.

From the smallest drone carrying a fixed-angle 720p digicam to the greatest octocopter (eight-rotor drone) carrying an Arri Alexa Mini or Red camera, all are stunning filmmaking tools.

Storytelling

Much of storytelling is about a factor of view; whose perspective do we see it from? What are we showing, and what are we not?

An appropriate drone shot can add a unique perspective to any movie style in a range of ways. Firstly, a high drone shot can, within a short time, establish the geography and subject position of a scene. Even in the most obscured or encumbered set, where a standard image may also not be viable, and where a dolly/track or crane might also struggle to help.

When it is essential that the target market recognizes the relationship between numerous topics in the film, a precise drone shot can ‘map’ that out successfully, which means your story can hastily progress.

Secondly, drone photographs can enhance your innovative intent, including emotional heft and underscoring the adage ‘show don’t tell’.

For example, you can bring up incredible moments in your movie using a sweeping drone shot, possibly beginning your shoot on your characters and pulling back extreme and broad to locate them inside a breath-taking scenery, imposing environment or impending peril. Seeing a bubbling volcano from the top down for example is a rare and spectacular treat and one that can be accomplished with a drone (albeit a tough challenge).

Drones permit an unencumbered view of your film’s world.

From viewing above a street party to hovering above mountains, drones can be used to beef up your storytelling (documentary, drama or any different manufacturing genre); it is precious to have this unique tool.

There are very expensive drones available on the market used for cinema-grade cameras on large productions. Still, with cautious planning and a simple consumer-grade drone, film-makers can add varying degrees of creativity, value, and, most of all, beautiful storytelling to even their most modest productions.

Below, I’ll lay out some of the motives you need to think about when using a drone in your productions.

Production Value

Previously, film-makers were restricted to using the height of a floor-standing digicam crane or a helicopter to shoot a movie from above. Drones have filled that gap by reducing the production cost.

In a business environment, you from time to time want that appealing ‘wow factor’ to persuade a potential customer that you are the right individual for the project. Suppose narrative fiction or documentary is your field. In that case, a beautiful drone shot will add value to your production and get these all-important competition programmers, acquisition executives or on-line audiences to sit-up and take the word of your movie over your competition.

 

Unusual Point-of-View

Like any shot or lens choice, the aerial photograph can add that definition and emphasis to your content. This applies equally to the digital camera’s literal positioning and a drone’s use to symbolize the film’s valid POV of concern.

For a digicam position, a drone shot gives the target market with a reasonably particular view from which to perceive your film, forcing the viewer to assume its meaning of the show’s content material.

Drifting drone photographs can bring loneliness, isolation and detachment or, conversely, openness, potential, nature and peace. The way they are advised is described via context; what precedes and follows your drone shot will be influenced by its meaning.

Fascinating use of this uncommon angle is the work of New Zealand-based photographer Tim Whittaker, whose use of a drone to seize the actions of sheep being herded in fields created notable results.

The camera’s distance reduces the sheep and sheepdogs to a mass of moving, swirling, grouping specks and creates a sequence that is greater akin to an art movie rather than a video of rural farming. 

Safety

Drones are spectacular, with no trouble, handy and first-rate fun. But they should be used safely, and within the regulations of the location, you are at. Many international locations require a licence for drones and that they are registered with the applicable authorities accountable for civil aviation.

Before using any drone on a production, ALWAYS ensure you have the appropriate:

It is safer to ask anyone who owns and operates a drone to assist you rather than to attempt and navigate this yourself in many cases. Carefully conceived and deliberate use of a drone can add great value to the overall video quality.

Author Bio:

Charlie Jenkins is a filmmaker and content writer for Bounce Video in Oxford UK. Bounce specialises in capturing and telling emotive stories through carefully crafted and produced videos for a whole host of clients.

Richard Tiland

Richard Tiland

Bio: I’m Richard Tiland, president of New Evolution and dk3studios. I’ve always had a passion for video. Even as a kid folks were always asking me to take the camera out of their face. Over the last 15 years, as I watched video grow I grew with it. I learned not only the skills required for making a high quality video, but the marketing techniques needed to bring in the best results.

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